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MPs Frank Field and Heidi Allen visit Waterloo Foodbank

Last week MPs Frank Field and Heidi Allen, along with a camera crew from Chanel 4 News, came to our Waterloo Foodbank and chatted with Rebekah Gibson our Advice Centre Manager who also looks after the food bank. 

Rebekah was joined by Waterloo Hub Leader Nathan Jones and Chris Price and Sharon Hunt our friends from the Southbank Foodbank run by PECAN. 

Frank Field and Heidi Allen came to find out about the work of our food bank to help inform a new report about the root causes of hunger in local communities: ‘Feeding Britain’.

How do we take evil seriously when we can’t see the wood for the trees?

In Chalke Talk 54, Steve poses the question: ‘how do we take evil seriously’ and he refers to St Paul’s words ‘our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world…’

Is that right?  Should we be looking for evil in the supermarket, the petrol station or the Department of Work and Pensions?

When I think of evil, it tends to be the things about me that lead me to fall-short of what I know God wants of and for me.  Can I really consider ‘the powers of this dark world’ to be forces of evil? 

If God’s not omnipotent then what’s the point in worship? Is God even a God?

In Chalke Talk 53, Steve asks us to question God’s omnipotence and my initial reaction, as Steve anticipates, is to protest.  The thought sits uncomfortably in my mind.  In fact I balk at the idea.  I want to stamp my foot in a toddler-like tantrum… protesting... ‘But God’s all powerful… surely…’?

Am I objecting because Steve’s words sound like heresy?  Is he being irreligious?  I can’t comment on the theology behind what Steve says but I know why I object to his words.  It’s because it’s comforting to think of God as all powerful. 

Faith, Science & Sexuality - special offer for Open Church Network Members

The Ozanne Foundation is running a one-day-event entitled ‘Faith, Science & Sexuality’ and we have a special offer for Open Church Network Members.

 

Sat, December 8, 2018              9:30 AM – 4:30 PM             

St. Johns Church, Waterloo, 73 Waterloo Road, London. SE1 8TY

 

With an impressive list of presenters the day should prove to be both interesting and thought-provoking and Open Church Network Members are being offered a discounted ticket rate.

Some irresponsible honesty from Pope Francis

Ben Payne responds to recent media coverage of the Pope's new book launch.

Pope Francis is ‘concerned’ about a ‘serious issue’; he’s also, returning to the kind of language we have long expected from the Catholic Church hierarchy.

I’m also concerned: concerned that contrary to his previous ‘moderniser’ track-record there is still old-fashioned intolerance at the heart of what he says.  I’m concerned by the lack of compassion is his recent statements.  I’m concerned by his apparent lack of understanding of how his utterances contribute to pain and suffering.

A matter of justice and love.

The Rev’d Dr Jonathan Tallon talks about teaching what the Bible has to say on sexuality.

Around one of the tables in front of me sit two students. One is a gay minister; the other comes from a conservative evangelical background. Other tables are filled with more students, male and female, from different denominations, traditions and countries.

I take an inward breath. I will need to tread carefully.  I am about to teach on Paul, his letter to the Romans and homosexuality.

Five small steps to becoming a more socially active church

Becoming more active in the community can be daunting for any church – however big or small.  Dave Parr, CEO of Oasis Community Partnerships shares his top five tips on how to get started.

For the last couple of years, I’ve been helping to lead an Oasis course called ‘Active Church.’  The premise is simple – a few church leaders gather and listen to us tell the story of Oasis and how we’ve engaged with our communities across the world and we, similarly, listen to their stories.